The economics of ecosystems and biodiversity for agriculture and food

Authored by more than 100 world class scientists including ecologists, economists, accountants, development practitioners and policy makers the ground breaking report on economics of ecosystems and biodiversity for agriculture and food is the first study that provides an authoritative and comprehensive assessment of our food system, covering topics such as farming, marketing, retailing and consumption. [Read full article]

Why we need a holistic approach to improve our complex food system

Our current food systems are incredibly complex, and are experiencing multiple failures across many measures of human and planetary well-being. An estimated 815 million people remain undernourished, while overconsumption of the wrong calories is simultaneously driving rises obesity and noncommunicable diseases across much of the globe. Agriculture is one of the biggest contributors to greenhouse gas emissions, as well as deforestation and land degradation. [Read full article]

Smarter metrics will help fix our food system

Today’s food systems are broken. Our diets are the leading cause of disease. Some 800 million people worldwide still suffer from hunger, while more than 2 billion are overweight or obese. As much as 57% of global greenhouse-gas emissions come from food-related activities, which include everything from clearing land for agriculture, to growing, gathering, processing and packaging, to transporting farm goods and disposing of waste. [Read full article]

Are You Paying Enough for Your Food?

Many factors contribute to the cost of a tomato. For example, what inputs were used (water, soil, fertilizer, pesticides, as well as machinery and/or labor) to grow it? What kind of energy and materials were used to process and package it? Or how much did transportation cost to get it to the shelf? [Read full article]

People Care When They See the Cost: Evaluating Food Systems

Pavan Sukhdev is the Founder-CEO of Gist-Advisory, a sustainability consultancy, and is on the Steering Committee for the new, groundbreaking report “The Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity for Agriculture and Food” (TEEBAgriFood). This report explores how to evaluate our agriculture and food systems while considering a range of social, human, and environmental impacts and dependencies along food value chains. [Read full interview]

Can New Report Bring Transparency to the Food System?

Kavita Sharma is an environmental manager for the U.N. Environment Program Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity Office (UNEP TEEB). She coordinates and provides support on the implementation of TEEB and is a chapter author of the new (TEEBAgriFood) report, which evaluates agriculture and food systems while considering a range of social, human, and environmental dimensions across the value chain. [Read full interview]

To fight climate change, policymakers should turn to food

Communities across the world are becoming more interested in eating a healthy, nutritious, and low-footprint diet. But there remains a big disconnect between consumers, producers, and the impact current production and consumption patterns have on the environment and climate. What can you do? The good news is that fighting climate change can start with each meal. [Read full article]

“EXTREME IS THE NEW NORMAL”

As the climate changes, the population of Africa is growing and fertile land and jobs are becoming scarcer. New ways are currently leading to urbanisation of agriculture and a new mid-sized sector in the countryside. [Read full article]

Enhancing Human and Planetary Health by Improving Agriculture

Dr. Harpinder Sandhu is an agricultural scientist with research interests in studying the interactions between society and the environment. His current research focuses on applying true cost accounting for the transformation of agriculture and food systems towards sustainability. He is an author of the new The Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity for Agriculture and Food (TEEBAgriFood) report on how to evaluate our agriculture and food systems while considering a range of social, human, and environmental dimensions across the value chain. [Read full article]